Spaniel pups - Maud Earl
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Ria Hörter

Dog Portraits

Published in "Dogs in Canada"

in the series "Dogs Not in Canada"

And in “Canine Chronicle” (U.S.A.)

History

and

development,

the

breed

today,

breed standards explained.

If you are interested in publishing one or more of these articles, illustrations and photographs included please contact me. E-mail: horter@tiscali.nl All articles are available in English and/or in Dutch.

Dogs Not in Canada - The Broholmer

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.
Dog Writer and Contributing Editor of Dog Magazines

Arranged in alphabetical order

Dogs Not in Canada - Cesky Fousek (Czech Republic)

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Dogs Not in Canada - The Cirneco dell'Etna

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Dogs not in Canada - Hollandse Smoushond - Dutch

Terrier  

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Dogs not in Canada – Jämthund (Swedish Elkhound)

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Dogs not in Canada - Kromfohrländer (Germany)

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Dogs not in Canada - Istarski Gonic - Istrian Hound

(Croatia)

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by

Alice van Kempen.

Dogs not in Canada - Volpino Italiano (Italy)

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Dogs not in Canada – Saarloos Wolfhond

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.
Page Up

Dogs Not in Canada - The Markiesje

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle – Cao de Castro Laboreiro

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.
Dogs Not in Canada 1. Broholmer (The) 2. Cesky Fousek - Czech Republic 3. Cirneco dell’Etna 4. Hollandse Smoushond - Dutch Terrier 5. Istarski Gonic - Istrian Hound, Croatia 6. Jämthund - Swedish Elkhound 7. Kromfohrlander - Germany 8. Markiesje - Netherlands 9. Saarloos Wolfshond - Netherlands 10. Volpino Italiano - Italy

Canine Chronicle - Dutch Partrigdge Dog

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle - Gammal Dansk Honsehund (Old

Danish Bird Dog)

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle - Glen of Imaal Terrier

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle – Hollandse Smoushond (Dutch

Terrier)

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle – Kromfohrländer

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle – Markiesje

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle - Large Munsterlander

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle - Poitevin

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle - Mudi

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.
Canine Chronicle 1. Bernese Mauntain Dog 2. Billy 3. Cao de Castro Laboreiro 4. Dutch Partrigdge Dog 5. Gammal Dansk Honsehund - Danmark 6. Glen of Imaal Terrier 7. Hollandse Smoushond - Dutch Terrier 8. Hungarian Sheepdogs Small 9. Hungarian Sheepdogs Large 10. Kromfohrländer 11. Large Munsterlander 12. Markiesje 13. Mudi 14. Poitevin 15. Pumi 16. Saarloos Wolfshond 17. Segugio Italiano - Italian Hound 18. Swiss Hounds

Arranged in alphabetical order

Dutch Partrigdge Dog - photo Alice van Kempen

Canine Chronicle – Pumi

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle - The Saarlooswolfshond

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle – Segugio Italiano (Italian Hound)

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle – Swiss Hounds

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.
Nederlands
Engels

Canine Chronicle - Hungarian Sheepdogs Small

Illustrated with old prints and photographs and new photos by Alice van Kempen.

Canine Chronicle - Hungarian Sheepdogs Large

Illustrated with old prints.

"Dogs Not in Canada"

1. Golden Retriever

Canine Chronicle - Billy

Pack Hunting Where does this large French scent hound with an English-sounding name come from, and when was it developed? To understand pack hunting in France, a brief survey of its development may be necessary. The history of pack hunting is more than 10,000 years old. In the Lascaux caves, in the French Dordogne, can still be seen drawings of a man hunting deer with his hounds. The drawings date from about 15000 years BC. When conquering Gaul around 50 BC, the Romans noticed that the Celtic Gauls hunted with their dogs. In medieval Gaul, only kings, noblemen, and high clergy could participate in the hunt. In France, as in many other Western European countries, the best hunting grounds and vast forests were reserved for the aristocracy.

BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG

Molassian Dogs The most likely theory about the origin of the Sennenhunde (mountain dogs) in Switzerland is that they descended from dogs that traveled from the ancient Far East via Epirus and Greece to Italy. During the Roman conquests of large parts of Europe, these Molossian dogs traveled with the Romans over the Alps into Switzerland, where they mingled with local farm dogs. Again… it’s a theory. Books about along with depictions of dogs – mostly guard dogs, gun dogs, and herding dogs – dating from the early Middle Ages, were kept in monasteries, and with noble families, etc

Canine Chronicle - BOERBOEL

Mastiffs and Molossers Most dog writers start the history of the Boerboel at around 1000 BC. They refer to Assurbanipal, King of the Iron Age Neo-Assyrian Empire from 668 BC to ca. 627 BC. One of the few kings in antiquity who could read and write, he became known for the Library of Assurbanipal, a collection of thousands of clay tablets dating from 7th century BC, that is now in the British Museum in London. These tablets include depictions of a lion hunt with dogs. These strong-headed, strongly muscled, hunting mastiffs are often incorrectly identified as the forefathers of dogs that instead descended from the Molossian Dog the Tibetan Mastiff, Great Dane, and Spanish Mastiff, for example. The Assyrian hunting mastiffs were bred to grip and hold. The Molossian dogs were flock guardians and hounds of the chase (The Mastiffs. The Big Game Hunters. Col. David Hancock, Charwynne Dog Features, 2005). The ancient Roman poet Grattius (or Gratius Faliscus, 63 BC to AD 14) wrote of British mastiffs, describing them as superior to the ancient Greek Molossus. “What if you choose to penetrate even among the Britons? How great your reward, how great your gain beyond any outlays! If you are not bent on looks and deceptive graces (this is the one defect of the British whelps), at any rate when serious work has come, when bravery must be shown, and the impetuous War-god calls in the utmost hazard, then you could not admire the renowned Molossians so much.” What about the word “molosser”? In dog literature, the terms “molosser” and “mastiff” are often used interchangeably. Sometimes, “molosser” is simply translated as “mastiff.” Dog writers from the past wrongly linked any large, heavy dogs to the Molossian dogs and labeled them molossers. Breeds such as the Dogue de Bordeaux, Mastiff, Bullmastiff, Fila, Brasileiro, Broholmer, etc., that are currently listed by the FCI under Molossoid Breeds, are not descendants of the Molossian dogs. English Bullmastiffs and Bulldogs were imported during the second Boer War in 1902. These dogs were crossed with the local dogs and the result was the so-called Boel, a forerunner of today’s Boerboel.

Canine Chronicle - CHOW-CHOW

The Dog of the Barbarians Some historians speculate that the Chow Chow, known in China for 2,000 years, was developed in Arctic Asia about 3,000 years ago. The dog did not look exactly like the present-day Chow Chow, but was a square-built animal that resembled a lion. The Complete Dog Book published by the American Kennel Club in 1935, speculated that the Chow originated in northern Siberia. As the property of nomads, these dogs would have arrived in China via Mongolia. It seemed that they were used as war dogs. People named the breed man kou, meaning “dog of the Barbarians.” It has been a long road, from war dog via gun dog, to guard dog and sled dog, later cloister dog and farm dog. For thousands of years, they served the people of China, and were regarded as valuable companions.